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Driving and Public Transport

Amsterdam - Driving and Public Transport


Cities the size of Amsterdam are bound to have traffic congestion issues, but the public transportation system in the region takes a serious load from private transportation. The public transit system includes rail, bus and ferry so that visitors and residents often have multiple public travel options.

Remember that Amsterdam's history includes the construction of two major canals. The Amsterdam-Rhine Canal provided direct access between the city and the Rhine. A second canal, the North Sea Canal, was created to provide similar access to the ports of the North Sea. The result is that some places in the city are simply easier to access by water than by land. Canal bus boats are one of the popular water travel options. Regular routes are run to several major areas of town, including the shopping districts.

Multiple ferries in the city can provide fast and easy transport to and from points in the city. There are several ferry options, including those just for cyclists and pedestrians, and some that are free of charge.

Bicycles are very popular in Amsterdam and you'll find that most city streets include an area for bike traffic. Many of the streets are narrow, making them more suited for bicycles than for cars. Think you're not up for a bike ride? Think again. The city boasts "taxi-cycles," small vehicles powered by pedals but with a seat for a passenger that looks very much like a small car.

Parking is at a premium and is typically very expensive. If you plan to drive a private car in Amsterdam, parking may be more of an issue than navigating the streets. Parking regulations are strictly enforced, especially in the inner city area. To find out more about parking in Amsterdam, visit http://www.naaramsterdam.nl/live/main.asp?display_framework=startpagina.

There's an extensive taxi system in place in Amsterdam, though it operates somewhat differently from those in large cities in other parts of the world. Pickup points are strictly identified and adhered to. "Train taxis" (treintaxis) are designated for travel to and from train stations. Passengers save money by sharing these taxi rides at specific times of the day.

If you plan to use the city's trams, busses or subways, you need to first know about the city zoning. The city is divided into areas known as zones and the number of zones you'll be traveling through determines the kind and cost of your travels. To use the public transit system, you purchase a strip ticket - available at terminals and many stores (even from vending machines). Tickets are stamped for each trip either by a conductor on a tram or by the traveller in one of the machines available in trams or at train/metro stations (tip - remember to stamp one more strip than the number of zones you intend to travel in, i.e. if you're travelling in two zones you need to stamp the third strip. Strange but true).

For visitors or the occasional traveler, a 24-hour ticket can be purchased that will allow unlimited traveling for any 24-hour period. It's not financially practical for the daily traveler. You can also purchase an eight-day ticket for occasional public travel needs - again, not practical for the resident who depends on the system daily. For more detailed data about the bus, tram and subway systems, visit www.gvb.nl


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Aetna

Our award-winning expatriate business provides health benefits to more than 650,000 members worldwide. In addition, we have helped develop world-class health systems for governments, corporations and providers around the world. We want to be the global leader in delivering world-class health solutions, making quality health care more accessible and empowering people to live healthier lives.

Bupa Global

At Bupa we have been helping individuals and families live longer, healthier, happier lives for over 60 years. We are trusted by expats in 190 different countries and have links with healthcare organisations throughout the world. So whether you're moving abroad for a change of career or a change of scene, with our international private health insurance you will always be in safe hands.

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